• SuperHawk27

    Don’t read any comments in any of the articles about Bollig….your eyes will bleed….

    • YoAdrienne

      But, the bleeding eyes will distract you from the pain you get from banging your head against the wall.

    • pepe_silvia

      Your eyes can’t bleed if you’ve already ripped them out! Ha!

    • ToucanStubbs

      There was a guy suggesting Bollig took a discount to play in Chicago..

    • The Nutbrown Hare

      Oh my lord…you’re not kidding. The comments section of ESPN’s article concerning Bollig’s departure had one poster suggest that Brandon has second-line talent, but was ‘bummed’ to be playing on the 4th line, hence his lack of jaw-dropping numbers.

    • The Nutbrown Hare

      Wait, wait…there’s an even better one. One ‘fan’ said her heart was hurt by the loss of Bollig.

      Yikes, I really should’ve heeded your advice and avoided said articles altogether.

      • YoAdrienne

        You should see Tumblr. Check out posts with #Brandon Bollig. Oy. There was one who was surprised that there was no rioting in the streets over the trade.

        • SuperHawk27

          It’s almost like the people who are making those comments aren’t even watching the games.

  • Sparky_The_Bard-barian

    Stan thinks Morin is ready, but what does Q think?

    • jacquescloutier

      ‘‘Mo has a different element to his game that you look forward to seeing
      progress,’’ Quenneville said. ‘‘He can score, he competes hard, he’s
      got some pace to his game and I thought he really progressed this year
      from his last couple of years. . . . You’re comfortable with him in all
      situations, and he can move up the ladder on our team.’’

      all situations meaning what exactly? sitting OR standing in the pressbox? now that’s versatility.

    • pepe_silvia

      I think the offseason is really key for Morin. We all know he has the offensive capabilities, but for Q to love him, it seems he’s going to need to up his defensive game. I think with some work he could become a Frolik-type player with an even better scoring touch. Just think of a 4th line of Smith-Kruger-Morin *salivates*

  • Brain Sprain

    What happens when you trade someone with a salary smaller than the remaining cap hit. Example: Marian Hossa. I am not advocating to trade Hossa, I’m just wondering what those old cba contacts mean under trading under this new cba. Does the whole cap hit go with the player or is their a recapture penalty to the prior team.

    • MySpoonIsTooBig

      Cap hit never changes. Hossa’s contract caries a $5.275M cap hit through 2020-21 regardless of whether he’s on the ‘Hawks or another team, and regardless of whether he’s earning $7.9M in actual salary (first 7 years), $4M (year 8), or $1M (years 9-12).

      The drawback to trading Hossa (other than the obvious drawback of not having Hossa anymore) is that it doesn’t give the ‘Hawks the opportunity to earn back any of the cap savings for which they will receive a cap recapture penalty if he retires early which would make the ‘Hawks penalty even steeper.

      Let’s just walk through an example. In the first 10 years of his contract, Hossa earns a total of $61.3M (7 years at $7.9M, 1 at $4M, and 2 at $1M). During that time, he costs a total of $52.75M against the cap ($5.275M x 10 years). Subtract cost against the cap from the total salary earned and you get a total cap savings of $8.55M. If Hossa retires there with 2 years left on his deal, the cap recapture penalty says that the ‘Hawks are penalized $8.55M against the cap spread out over the remaining 2 years so $4.275M per year. However, what happens if the ‘Hawks trade Hossa after year 8? Well after 8 years Hossa will have earned $59.3M (7 years at $7.9M, 1 at $4M) while costing only $42.2M against the cap ($5.275M x 8 years) for a total cap savings of $17.1M. If the ‘Hawks were to trade Hossa after year 8, because the they aren’t paying back those cap savings in those 2 years by having Hossa on the roster and paying him less than his cap hit, the ‘Hawks total cap savings doesn’t come down at all from that $17.1M so if he retired after year 10 the ‘Hawks annual cap penalty would be $17.1M spread out over 2 years for $8.55M a year, or double what it would have been had he stayed a ‘Hawk. Meanwhile, the team he was traded to would have absolutely nothing to worry about in terms of cap recapture because they were paying less than his cap hit the whole time and didn’t enjoy any cap savings.

      It’s all really complicated and stupid. The cap recapture penalty is a complete farce.

      • Brain Sprain

        Thanks. Helpful. It’s hard to understand the old contracts under the new cba and the recapture penalty.

      • jacquescloutier

        pardon my ignorance on the subject, but the recapture was instituted after hossa’s contract was signed? if so, that’s some serious ex post facto bs, and i can’t believe existing contracts wouldn’t be grandfathered.

        • http://www.lotsofbutterplease.com/ I am not Chico Maki

          The penalty was instituted exclusively for those contracts so that teams couldn’t just bury them or trade them to cap-floor teams in order to escape the stupidness of their size and length. The new CBA outlines rules that forbid them now (max terms, restrictions on how they decline over the years).

        • The Other One

          You are dead on here. See my note immediately above.

      • ToucanStubbs

        I don’t think its a farce at all. Teams knew what they were doing when they signed those contracts and they knew it was a risk that the league would come back to bite them for it. This isn’t like a legal system where you can’t punish people with laws created after the fact. I think teams trying to make a mockery out of a salary cap are playing with fire.

        Even if you think its unfair and stupid, the league gave them a way out of it with the compliance buyouts. We chose not to do that with Hossa and I have a nagging feeling we’re going to get fucked in the ass by it. Cooke, Neal, and Torres are now all in the West; it takes one dirty play by them to end Hossa’s career. Maybe he’s lost all ability to play at the level of a 5.7m caphit (or whatever his exact amount it) but he can still skate and play poorly. The league won’t let us put him on LTIR so now we’re in a shitty position.

        It’s hard because buying him out would cripple our Cup run but not buying him out may cripple us in the future, depending on where the cap ends up. Overall, I agree that its very complicated but teams put themselves in this situation and now get to deal with it.

        • The Other One

          Ummm – no. The league signed off and those contracts and then decided to retroactively punish them (again, they signed off on them). The thing that chaps my ass is that Gaborik’s deal in LA is basically the same thing, without being as extreme on both ends of the deal, and it’s somehow okay. The league got caught flat-footed by smart capologists (lead by Detroit) and they decided they had to do something about it. To me, those deals should have been allowed in as intended, and then “no more” after.

          If Hossa gets nocked out by Cooke, Neal, or Torres, he goes on LTIR indefinitely, like Pronger and Savard. Moribundly speaking, that’s the ideal scenario for the Hawks. And yes, he could go to LTIR in that case because he couldn’t play due to injury – not “old”.

          • ToucanStubbs

            Going on to LTIR is not a guaranteed thing. The league has the right to approve it themselves with a third-party doctor. Its entirely possible that he gets hurt and still has the ability to play at a greatly reduced level. That would be the worst case scenario, a Scott Gomez situation.

            And again, you might think its a farce but I disagree. Don’t treat your opinion as if its binding fact. The league signed off and then changed their minds. Sorry but they can do that. It’s their league and the teams belong to it. They can do whatever they want and if teams don’t like it, they have the option to leave. I think we forget that beyond the Big 4, there have been other leagues that have crumbled. Maybe one day the NHL will be the one that falls apart. Just like the teams signing absurd contracts, they may do what they want now and it might screw them in the future.

            I know its a classic case of ex post facto but like I said, this isn’t a court of law, its a sports league. The league gets to regulate the teams and clearly are doing so. I personally completely understand their position. Teams found a loophole and exploited it. While it was technically within the CBA, it was certainly disingenuous. We call it a loophole because we all know it wasn’t intended nor within the spirit of the CBA. If the goal is to restrict player salaries and team payrolls, back-diving contracts are completely to the contrary.

            Cap recapture sucks. We don’t like it because it hurts our team but that doesn’t mean it isn’t the right or fair thing to do.

          • The Other One

            I don’t disagree with you, but the league is absolving themselves of any responsibility here by going back in time and changing the rules of the game after the fact. Yes, it’s not a court of law and they have their own bylaws, but all I’m saying is that if you’re going to nuke the Hossa deal, you can’t allow the Kings and Gaborik to do something similar going forward (although not quite as extreme). Either you can do it, or you can’t – don’t give me this “in between” BS that the Kings are now doing.

          • ToucanStubbs

            Gaborik’s contract is nowhere near the back diving contracts of Hossa and the like. They took it to the 50% limit in variability but as far as percentage of salary, his cap hit is 80% of the salary. Hossa’s was 66%. There will always be teams trying to get as cheap a cap hit as possible. But there has to be a line somewhere. They’ve drawn this line and I think it is sufficient. I hate the Kings as much as the next guy but to pretend Gaborik’s new contract is anything near the back-diving of the last CBA is a joke.

          • The Other One

            Yea, did you notice I said “although not quite as extreme”? I see what you’re doing with the percentages, but given the present age of Gabby, along with the length of the deal and his recent injury history, they’re trying to do the same thing.

          • The Other One

            Oh, and one more thing… the line obviously “moved” with the last CBA, and the Hawks are now (or will be)paying for it…

        • MySpoonIsTooBig

          The league left a loophole in the prior CBA which teams that had the means to do so took advantage of. The league had the power refuse to register those contracts if they deemed them unfair, inappropriate, or in some way a violation of the spirit or letter of the CBA – they did just that with the initial Kovalchuck deal. The league accepted, and declined the opportunity to register any sort of complaint, the front-loaded contracts for players like Hossa, Luongo, Christian Ehrhoff, Shea Weber, etc. were signed.

          So yes, it as absolutely 100% farcical for the league to retroactively punish teams (and to a certain extent, players – hello Christian Ehrhoff buyout) over contracts that the league specifically approved just a few years earlier.

  • pepe_silvia

    Bollig is gone, now we just need the coaching staff to give Regin a real chance on the third line and then we’ll have the ability to roll 4 lines confidently. The thought of Bickell-Regin-Shaw and Smith-Kruger-Morin as the 3rd and 4th lines is wonderful.

    • MySpoonIsTooBig

      That’ll be kinda difficult what with Regin being an unrestricted free agent and Stan making no apparent attempt to re-sign him. It’s probably partially due to being right up against the salary cap and partially due to the fact that he couldn’t beat out Bollig (in Q’s opinion) for ice time last season, but I don’t think there’s much of a chance of the ‘Hawks bringing back Regin.

      • pepe_silvia

        Ah, I wasn’t aware he was a UFA. Well, I guess he’s gone then, unfortunately. I think we all liked what we saw in the limited capacity. I just hope we have another guy who fits in the checking line role that can also play center and allow Shaw to play wing.

  • Andrew Heitman
    • ‘hawks58

      He’s probably asking $6M per, so you would be talking Sharp and a pick/prospect most likely.

      • Andrew Heitman

        Would that be the worst thing? 63 points last year…with Columbus….depth at wing isnt a problem. You get a 21 year old future start for an aging winger? I dunno. I love Sharpie.

        Im sure Sharp is not wanting a trade…but this day dream central these days and the Cubs suck…so…